One day in Verona – or vandalism in the name of love

Moving forward with our story, we took a train from Mantua which took us to our next destination: Verona. This was a longer trip; after spending two and a half hours in the cold train, we arrived in the city of Romeo and Juliet.

At Verona train station, again, a cloudy cold day was spreading its evil arms around us. On top of the grayish ambiance, an annoying rain was “making” my day. After twenty minutes of unpleasant walk we arrived at the hotel. A fast check-in helped my small feet feel warm and dry again πŸ™‚ .

We started our visit at a slow pace, walking under the cover of a fragile umbrella, toward the old town. As we walked on its tight lanes, the smell of old wet buildings overwhelmed us. Soon my warm cold feet became once more cold and soaked. The many flocks of tourists which jammed the main squares made the air hard to breathe and the beautiful architecture impossible to admire. The nervous footsteps touching the wet pavement created a strange sound effect. It was something very curious about that city.

Taken by a strong current of tourists, we found ourselves in the middle of Piazza Bra. Verona Arena was rising with its majestic columns in one of the cold corners of the square. Getting closer, we were able to admire the wide stone arches, which, with hundreds of years experience still host large scale events like opera performances and concerts.

We turned on the left side street – Via Giuseppe Mazzini – and we admired the shops invaded by tourists. Lots of balconies filled with small palm trees and flowers were guiding our walk. All of a sudden the annoying rain stopped. Yay! It was high time to visit the house of the world’s notorious love queen, Juliet Capulet. And yes, in case you wonder, fictional characters do seem to have houses of their own πŸ™‚ . At the end of Mazzini street, we turned right and after few steps, there it was!

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A once upon a time superb 14th century brick house greeted us. At present, Juliet’s house is vandalized in the name of love by the thousands of tourists which prove their love on the fragile walls. At the entrance, not even the house sign has not been spared by the passionate lovers. Stickers, all the letters of the alphabet surrounded by hearts,Β  and even nasty words are stretched all over the edifice. Well, if this didn’t help you to get a first impression, there’s more to come: as you pass the long corridor the mayhem gets unleashed. Plaster boards (thanks God it’s not the walls this time!) attached to the right and left walls are maimed daily under hundreds of layers of marker. All the names in the world, of all the countries in the world lie there angry, as they get covered over and over again by other heavy layers of pure love. If you try to get closer to those walls – and I do not recommend it – you might get pushed, hit, or even cursed with great passion by the in love vandals which are waiting for their turn to print their declaration. The heavy fighting is for the almost absent free corners on the top of the wall. And trust me, people do get creative and climb the walls, so they could leave, at least till the next brave visitor arrives, a proof of their unprecedented love.

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If you’re lucky and manage to escape alive the horror of the love corridor, I wish you lots of luck and patience with the inner courtyard. But more then that, I hope you have a long strong neck, to make it possible for you to see Juliet’s infamous balcony. Why infamous? Because that beautiful darn balcony had put her into so much trouble! πŸ™‚

Sitting on my toes, I was able to admire for a second the courtyard. There was no hope for us to visit and be able to take a picture impersonating beautiful Juliet sobbing for love. The zombie lovers were getting hungrier for love as they were fighting for a perfect sugar picture. We decided to leave, until we would get intoxicated with the crazy love substance which was floating all around, and would probably turn us into heart-shaped-gremlins πŸ™‚ .

As we were abandoning the courtyard, I heard a desperate cry for help. It was Juliet’s house, asking us not to visit anymore, as she is sinking slowly under the heavy weight of love messages and letters which were written or left even in the places where no one should dare to get.

Feeling sad for the helpless building we continued our visit with Piazza Delle Erbe. Amazing buildings were surroundingΒ  the spacious square. Behind it, as a brave knight, Torre Lamberti was rising.

After walking a bit on the crowded streets, we crossed the bridge over river Adige. On the other side of the river, you can find another another beautiful site, the Ancient Roman Theater of Verona.

Tired, after walking on gorgeous streets and climbing many stairs we began a slow procession toward our temporary home. On the way back, we visited the old walls of Castelvecchio, which I dare say, were quite impressive.

Please visit Verona. But visit the beautiful city as you would visit your favorite grandmother. Do it quiet, gentle and with lots of care, without causing any discomfort, as you’d like to have her in this world for as long as possible.

Now prepare your bags, as our next stop in Padua will be! πŸ™‚

 

 

 

 

 

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Author: thefunnyoneblog

I'm Cristiana. Simply me and simply funny!

7 thoughts on “One day in Verona – or vandalism in the name of love”

  1. I agree, unfortunately idiots are travelling everywhere…
    Forgetting about that, Verona is really beautiful.
    I come from a small village on lake Iseo, which is maybe the luckiest place in northern Italy: it’s quiet and relaxing to live, and it’s exactly placed in the middle and at about the same distance from beautiful locations as Verona, Mantua, Cremona, Bergamo, Milan, lake Como, lake Garda and the mountains πŸ™‚ but it’s the less touristic place in the area probably, that’s why is perfect πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m sure you’ll like it, especially the big island in the middle (Montisola), from the church on its top the view is great πŸ™‚ but also from the surrounding mountains, especially Corna Trentapassi or Monte Guglielmo πŸ™‚

        Like

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